Click here for a basic driving itinerary!

CHEROHALA SKYWAY HERITAGE TRAIL ITINERARIES
thanks to the Tennessee Overhill Heritage Association

Historic "Furs to Factories" Heritage Trail
Click here for documentation and driving map!

The Furs to Factories Heritage Trail has been described as a “museum without walls.” The story of how the Industrial Revolution played out in the Southern Appalachians is a compelling narrative that is linked to the nation’s history. Each stop along the way acts as a chapter in the story. A 1757 British fort, Cherokee museum, Victorian train station, 1890 railroad, historic copper mine, ancient trade path, two national scenic byways, and a textile mill village are examples of what modern day explorers will find on the Furs to Factories Heritage Trail. And getting there is part of the experience. Two national scenic byways, train excursions, and Cherokee National Forest hiking and biking trails make exploring the Tennessee Overhill a memorable experience. Click the map below for travel info and driving map.

Click here for Historic Heritage Trail Itinerary

 


"Crafts" Heritage Trail
Click here for documentation and driving map!

Art and artists have long been influenced by the landscapes that surround them. They often draw materials, as well as inspiration, from the land itself. We invite you to find both art and inspiration as you travel scenic byways and rural highways through changing landscapes and small communities. Art galleries and craft shops are sprinkled throughout the region in historic downtowns, along backroads, and in the heart of the mountains.
Click the map below for travel info and driving map.

Click here for Crafts Heritage Trail information and driving map.


"Cherokee" Heritage Trail
Click here for documentation and driving map!

The Cherokee once commanded much of the southern Appalachians. Archaeological evidence, early written accounts, and the oral history of the Cherokee themselves demonstrate that Cherokees controlled more than 130,000 square miles. The original Cherokee homeland has been altered over the past 200 years, with new roads and towns, and vanishing chestnuts and buffalo, but the shape of the hills and valleys remain much the same as Cherokees experienced them for thousands of years. And Cherokee people are still here. They live in the modern world but many still sing the old songs and practice the old ways. We invite you to explore part of the Cherokee homeland in Tennessee and North Carolina. Museums and historic sites will reveal the long and compelling Cherokee history, while festivals and events make it possible for you encounter Cherokee people and traditions. Click the map below for travel info and driving map.

Cherokee Heritage Trail